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Thread: Bit Depth

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
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    34

    Bit Depth

    I have some Digital Master Recording CD's I want to rip and get the best possible sounding audio files.

    I was going to set the bit depth to 24 Bit from 16 Bit.

    16 Bit says to apply dither. Why is it not checked as a default for a 16 Bit Depth.

    Looking at the posts on the forum not sure what is the best setting to use.

    Does ripping at a higher bit dept potentially give you a better sounding flac file.

    I really don't understand what DSP Bit Dept even does.

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    18

    Re: Bit Depth

    Since the Cd is 16-bit, it really makes no sense to convert to a higher bit depth. Doing so will only make your files larger.

    The bit depth DSP does exactly what it says -- it changes the bit depth. It is mainly of use with the converter. You might wat to convert 24-bit files to 16-bit to use them on a portable player with limited space, for example. Another use is to convert to 32-bit for processing the file, for example when using VSTs for things like filtering. They can produce more accurate results due to greater mathematical precision. You would then convert back to 16-bit to save the file.

  3. #3
    dBpoweramp Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Florida, USA
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    4,690

    Re: Bit Depth

    As @EdBrady noted, there is zero benefit in converting a 16/44.1 file (redbook CD) to 24/xxxx. It does nothing other than make the file larger. One can't magically turn a 16 bit file into a true 24 bit file with ripping/converting.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    34

    Re: Bit Depth

    So why does dBpoweramp have a bit depth setting or any DSP settings if all CD's should be ripped as is.

    Why is there a DSP 16 bit with dithering?
    When a CD is ripped does it use 16 bit without dithering automatically, or do you need to turn it on.

    I guess I don't understand when ripping a CD why you have any DSP options in the ripping menu.

    I know all CD's don't sound the same, some sound really good, and other's not good at all.

    So when ripping there is really nothing you can do to improve the sound quality of a poor recorded CD, garbage in, garbage out.

    Comments?

  5. #5
    dBpoweramp Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    4,690

    Re: Bit Depth

    So why does dBpoweramp have a bit depth setting or any DSP settings if all CD's should be ripped as is.

    Mostly because people use it to *down*convert a 24/96 or 24/192 to 16/44.1 or 16/48. This is often because their players won't handle hi-res (e.g., Sonos), or because they are using it to create mp3 files, etc. for portable use. And because Spoon even creates options for *crazy* people that want certain things (see for example the useless option of FLAC UNCOMPRESSED ).

    Why is there a DSP 16 bit with dithering?
    When a CD is ripped does it use 16 bit without dithering automatically, or do you need to turn it on.

    Converting from 24 to 16, see above. and no, if ripping a CD, one does not need to use dithering. Not necessary as one is not changing the bit depth (16 bit in, 16 bit out, no dithering needed or even recommended)

    I guess I don't understand when ripping a CD why you have any DSP options in the ripping menu.


    Some of these DSPs are utility DSPs and do things like add ReplayGain tags or do some automatic ID TAG mapping, etc. In my own case, I use FLAC, default settings and the only DSP I use is the one that creates TRACK and ALBUM ReplayGain tags in the files.

    I know all CD's don't sound the same, some sound really good, and other's not good at all. So when ripping there is really nothing you can do to improve the sound quality of a poor recorded CD, garbage in, garbage out.

    Correct. Garbage in Garbage out. Nothing in the ripping or converting process can make a bad CD (or even a good CD) sound better. What one wants is a bitperfect rip of the CD, good, bad or otherwise.
    Last edited by garym; 08-02-2020 at 10:54 AM.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    34

    Re: Bit Depth

    Thank you for your reply.

    You helped me understand ripping.

    Thanks again.

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