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Thread: CD Ripping Speed

  1. #1

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    CD Ripping Speed

    I've taken on the task of ripping my 700+ CD collection into 24-bit 44.1 kHz FLACs. My CDs were purchased anywhere from the early '80's up to now, so there's a wide variety in the quality of the recordings. However, I've been noticing that most of the discs made in the 80's and 90's seem to rip at most x8 to x10 speed while some of the newer ones have ripped at up to x30+ speed. These are all standard 600 MB sized CDs with normal audio times ranging from 30 to 60 minutes. I'm just curious - why is there such a variation in ripping speeds? If there are any deficiencies in the discs, it's at a microscopic level. The discs themselves look (and are kept) pristine. Thanks for any enlightenment that can be provided!

  2. #2
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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Quote Originally Posted by GumbyDammit223 View Post
    I've taken on the task of ripping my 700+ CD collection into 24-bit 44.1 kHz FLACs. My CDs were purchased anywhere from the early '80's up to now, so there's a wide variety in the quality of the recordings. However, I've been noticing that most of the discs made in the 80's and 90's seem to rip at most x8 to x10 speed while some of the newer ones have ripped at up to x30+ speed. These are all standard 600 MB sized CDs with normal audio times ranging from 30 to 60 minutes. I'm just curious - why is there such a variation in ripping speeds? If there are any deficiencies in the discs, it's at a microscopic level. The discs themselves look (and are kept) pristine. Thanks for any enlightenment that can be provided!
    I haven't kept track officially, but I too notice variation in ripping speed. Doesn't seem to be related to how new or old the CD is in my case. Ripping slower or faster I don't think has anything to do with damage on the disk. And it certainly has nothing to do with ultimate quality of the rip. Just keep ripping and you'll eventually be done!

    On another note, why are you ripping to 24/44.1 rather than 16/44.1. CDs are 16/44.1 (redbook standard) and ripping them to 24 bit does not somehow change these into 24 bit audio files. It simply makes the files much larger while providing NO additional digital information. You are best to rip the CDs to FLAC as 16/44.1.

  3. #3
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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Seems to have something to do with who pressed the CDs, possibly what replication facility. I've recently ripped a bunch of Rhino "back in times" CDs. Every one only rips at 8X Others of same age from other record companies rip at 30X.

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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Quote Originally Posted by garym View Post
    *snip*

    On another note, why are you ripping to 24/44.1 rather than 16/44.1. CDs are 16/44.1 (redbook standard) and ripping them to 24 bit does not somehow change these into 24 bit audio files. It simply makes the files much larger while providing NO additional digital information. You are best to rip the CDs to FLAC as 16/44.1.
    Well, I was under the impression that it would help quality. Something I thought I read in some audiophile forum somewhere. Seemed strange to me too, but something about "giving the audio somewhere to grow" for a highly scientific explanation. Oh well, HDD space is cheap.

    I would really like to understand the discrepancies in ripping speed though. As I go through the Discogs entries for each release trying to find my specific one, I'm beginning to realize there can be a LOT of versions for each release. And in a lot of cases, my specific disc still doesn't match the closest entry in the database. So, something is different here. I'm guessing there another something that affects ripping speed. But what could it be??? Back in the '90's I remember reading about laserdisc rot. Could something similar be happening here? That was a macroscopic process. Could this be signs of degradation at a microscopic level? I'd really love to know!

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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Quote Originally Posted by schmidj View Post
    Seems to have something to do with who pressed the CDs, possibly what replication facility. I've recently ripped a bunch of Rhino "back in times" CDs. Every one only rips at 8X Others of same age from other record companies rip at 30X.
    Yeah, I'm guessing it has something to do with how it was made. Maybe I'll have to start taking extra notes about ripping speed and try to correlate that against whatever information I can glean from the Discogs entries.

  6. #6
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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Quote Originally Posted by GumbyDammit223 View Post
    Yeah, I'm guessing it has something to do with how it was made. Maybe I'll have to start taking extra notes about ripping speed and try to correlate that against whatever information I can glean from the Discogs entries.
    I don't understand your concern over ripping speed. What we are after here is bit-perfect rips, whether that is at x2, x8 or x32 speed, in the end it does not matter.

    CDs with a lot of frame errors will rip slower as CD Ripper and/or the optical drive tries to re-rip the frames.

  7. #7
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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Quote Originally Posted by GumbyDammit223 View Post
    Well, I was under the impression that it would help quality. Something I thought I read in some audiophile forum somewhere. Seemed strange to me too, but something about "giving the audio somewhere to grow" for a highly scientific explanation. Oh well, HDD space is cheap.
    As long as you understand that what you read (despite the scientific mumbo jumbo) was complete nonsense. Also understand that your resulting files are no longer bit perfect copies of the original CDs. But they are your files and certainly the decision is yours on how to rip and store.

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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Quote Originally Posted by mville View Post
    I don't understand your concern over ripping speed. What we are after here is bit-perfect rips, whether that is at x2, x8 or x32 speed, in the end it does not matter.

    CDs with a lot of frame errors will rip slower as CD Ripper and/or the optical drive tries to re-rip the frames.
    I rip a disk with an x8 ripping speed. The following disk, roughly the same size files, rips with an x30 ripping speed. Both disks appear to my eye to be undamaged in any way and no retries while ripping. I want to know what causes the difference because there is obviously something causing the machine to read slower in one case.
    Last edited by GumbyDammit223; 05-14-2018 at 10:35 PM.

  9. #9
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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Quote Originally Posted by GumbyDammit223 View Post
    I want to know what causes the difference because there is obviously something causing the machine to read slower in one case.
    It's likely caused by how the disc was engineered, possibly in combination with the particular optical drive being used. CD Ripper does the best it can with what's presented to it.

    I have also seen variations in speeds. One disc ripped at 2X speed; fortunately, it was only about 45 minutes in total length. In the end, all tracks passed muster with AccurateRip, which is the most important thing.

  10. #10
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    Re: CD Ripping Speed

    Quote Originally Posted by GumbyDammit223 View Post
    I want to know what causes the difference because there is obviously something causing the machine to read slower in one case.
    Not all CDs are manufactured the same e.g. not all CDs contain CD-Text.

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